Bristol University Fire Reminds Us of Fire Safety Basics

Bristol University Fire Reminds Us of Fire Safety Basics

Bristol University Fire Reminds Us of Fire Safety Basics

England’s Bristol University had a roof-top fire that put their emergency procedures to the test. The historic Fry Building is undergoing a renovation to become the University’s new math department. On January 8th, Avon Fire and Rescue declared the fire was accidental and likely a result of the ongoing works.

BBC News reported that “the blaze caused extensive damage to the fifth floor and roof but as the fire service was alerted quickly it was able to prevent the flames from spreading to other historic buildings nearby.”

This reminds us that not only do our fire protection systems need to be kept up-to-code but our processes in the event of a fire need to be kept up-to-date as well.

3 Ways to Keep Fire Safety Basics in Mind in an Emergency

Update Life Safety Drawings
Changes to your life safety system can impact evacuation routes. If there are changes in your life safety drawings to fire-rated walls, doors or ceilings, be sure to see if they will affect emergency exits.

Educate Students
In your early 20’s, fire safety is not at the first thing on your mind in college. Keeping young adults informed of university policies and dorm room fire safety basics can help stop the spread of a fire.

Educate Staff
During an emergency evacuation, educated staff members help make the process go smoothly. Help them to become a leader in the event of a fire.

Fire emergencies can happen anytime, anywhere and can cause major damage to your facility. Even worse, it can injure or even kill building occupants. Facilities in the United States are responsible for maintaining their passive fire barrier system to keep them code compliant.

__________________________________________

The life safety specialists at Prevent have you covered for all of your fire barrier component service needs. Call 1-877-392-6074 to discuss your compliance or request a free quote online.

Read BBC News’ full story